Save Our Sugar Gliders – Heathmont we need your help

Heathmont’s remaining sugar gilders need help, and you can be part of the solution. This project invites residents to become stewards for wild life. 

It wasn’t that long ago Sugar Gliders were a common sight in Heathmont, emerging at dusk and flying past you to their supper.   With wildlife corridors critical for our native fauna to survive and thrive, yet due to urban pressures many are disappearing unnoticed.  

Sugar gliders are a keystones species that will help us map remaining wildlife corridors. This project, spearheaded by First Friends of Dandenong Creek, and supported by Maroondah Council and Abzeco, records glider occupancy in specially designed, strategically placed nesting boxes. The boxes will be installed in reserves, schools and gardens. Trained experts will check their occupancy regularly and document the findings. Findings will inform a corridor strategy for the Heathmont area that First Friends of Dandenong Creek and Maroondah Council can use to protect, maintain and enhance our corridors.  With increasing urban development, the unseen corridors they live and travel in are disappearing.

Residents can join a monitoring group or host a ‘nest box’ tree home for gliders in their garden. There are 100 new nest boxes to be placed. Monitors will connect with like-minded others in a biannual audit (depending upon COVID restrictions) of gliders in boxes. Furthermore, they will know that their findings will help inform a dynamic corridor development strategy.

If you are interested in supporting this work and can host a nest box in your garden or school, then please contact us at: ffdc1999@gmail.com

Please note, you must fall within the Sugar Glider survey zone, which is the area bordered by Canterbury Road, Heathmont Road, Dandenong Creek and Wantirna Road.

Wish to thank Hon. Michael Sukkar MP for supporting our application to the Federal Government’s Communities Environment Program

Anthony Bigelow

First Friends of Dandenong Creek

Many thanks to Nalini Scarfe for permission to use the gorgeous photos of sugar gliders seen on this page.